Blenheim Palace running entirely on renewable energy thanks to Good Energy

 

 

Blenheim Palace has switched to 100% renewable power supplied by Good Energy, as part of an ongoing commitment to end its reliance on fossil fuels.

 

Good Energy will meet all electricity demand to the palace, pleasure gardens, Park Farm, the new estates office in Woodstock and its on-site bottling plant.

 

The new agreement also includes the palace’s Windrush Industrial Estate, allowing third party businesses based there to achieve their own sustainability commitments.

 

The new partnership with Good Energy forms part of Blenheim Palace’s 10 year goals to reduce it’s energy consumption. The palace has committed to becoming a net generator of green energy within a decade, with photovoltaic panels, bio-mass boilers and a hydroelectric turbine.

Earlier this year, Blenheim also introduced its green electric vehicle fleet and, more recently, the Twizy Tours experience where visitors can explore the estate and its surrounds in the iconic electric vehicles. Together with electric buggies, this means the energy needed to supply all these transport modes can be met with a green and clean supply.

Blenheim’s sustainability advisor, Jacqueline Gibson, said: “Blenheim is on track to reducing its consumption of energy, meeting energy demands with renewables, and in time, to becoming our very own green energy supplier – safeguarding energy security in the long term across the estate”.

 

“This new agreement means that, while we continue to increase our own renewable energy production, we are supporting a sustainable energy industry within the UK to further reduce the Estate’s carbon footprint,” she added.

 

Randall Bowen, sales and commercial director at Good Energy, said: “We are delighted to be teaming up with Blenheim Palace to supply the estate with 100% renewable electricity.”

 

Founded in 1999, Good Energy powers homes and businesses with 100% renewable electricity from a community of over 1,400 UK generators. The company owns and operate two wind farms, including the UK’s first commercial wind farm, and eight solar farms.

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